Wednesday, August 31, 2016

More on Maine Woods Monument, for EII

Physics lab safety and procedures

Physics Laboratory Safety

The equipment and apparatus you will use involve various safety hazards, just as they do for working physicists. You must be aware of these hazards. Your teacher will guide you· in properly using the equipment and carrying out the experiments, but you must also take responsibility for your part in this process. With the active involvement of you and your teacher, these risks can be minimized so that working in the physics laboratory can be a safe, enjoyable process of discovery.

These safety rules apply in the lab

1.     Always have your safety goggles and wear them whenever using tools or equipment, or whenever the instructor tells you to.
2.     Personal apparel should be appropriate for laboratory work. On lab days avoid wearing long necklaces, dangling bracelets, bulky jewelry, and bulky or loose-fitting clothing. Long hair should be tied back. Loose, dangling items may get caught in moving parts, accidentally contact electrical connections, or interfere with the investigation in a potentially hazardous manner. In addition, chemical fumes may react with some jewelry, such as pearls, and ruin them. Cotton clothing is preferable to wool, nylon, or polyester. Wear shoes that will protect your feet from chemical spills and falling objects-open-toed shoes or sandals, and shoes with woven leather straps are not allowed in the laboratory.
3.     NEVER work alone in the laboratory. Work in the lab only while under the supervision of your instructor. Do not leave equipment unattended while it is in operation.
4.     Only books and notebooks needed for the experiment should be in the lab. One book bag may be kept by your seat. Use the atrium/mud room to store other stuff, especially skateboards and other items that could get in the way or cause an accident.
5.     Listen! Your instructor will review applicable safety precautions before the lab. If you are not sure of something, ask your instructor about it. Turn cell phone ringers off. Always heed safety symbols and cautions written in the experimental investigations and handouts, posted in the room, and given verbally by your instructor. They are provided for your safety.
6.     Know the proper fire drill procedures and the location of fire exits and emergency equipment. Make sure you know the procedures to follow in case of a fire or an emergency.
7.     If your clothing catches on fire, do not run; WALK to one of the two showers in the building, stand under it, and turn it on. Call to your instructor while you do this.
8.     Report all accidents to the instructor immediately, no matter how minor. In addition, if you get a headache, feel sick to your stomach, or feel dizzy, tell your instructor immediately.
9.     Report all spills to your instructor immediately. Call your instructor rather than trying to clean up a spill yourself. Your instructor will tell you if it is safe for you to clean up the spill; if not, your instructor will know how the spill should be cleaned up safely.
10. Student-designed investigations, such as the work for the final project, must be approved by the teacher before being attempted by the student.
11. DO NOT perform unauthorized experiments or use materials and equipment in a manner for which they were not intended. Use only materials and equipment listed in the activity equipment list or authorized by your teacher. Steps in a procedure should only be performed as described in the textbook or lab manual or approved by your teacher.
12. Stay alert in the lab, and proceed with caution. Be aware of others near you or your equipment when you are performing an experiment. If you are not sure of how to proceed, ask.
13. Horseplay in the lab is very dangerous. Laboratory equipment and apparatus are not toys; never play in the lab or use lab time or equipment for anything other than their intended purpose.
14. Food, beverages, and chewing gum are NEVER permitted in the lab room during lab hours.
15. Exercise caution when working with electrical equipment. Inspect all such equipment before use or get the instructor to inspect it for you. Do not use electrical equipment with frayed or twisted wires. Be sure your hands are dry before using electrical equipment. Do not let electrical cords dangle from work stations; dangling cords can cause electrical shocks and other injuries.
16. Keep work areas and apparatus clean and neat. Always dean up any clutter made during lab work, rearrange apparatus in an orderly manner, and report any damaged or missing items. Return all equipment and tools to where you found them at the end of the lesson or when switching to a different activity.
17. Always wash your hands with soap and water at the conclusion of each investigation.

The Great Depression, for Intro and Ecological Economics

For EC 2123 and 3003.

We'll watch the first part of this movie today in EC 3003. It isn't needed until next week, or the week after, in EC 2123.

Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Introduction to economics -- the ancient slave states

Watch the movie below. I'll show the first twenty minutes in class. Watch the rest for homework:

A second movie, on constitutional systems, is merely gratuitous:

Friday, August 26, 2016

On national parks and wilderness areas, for EII

We'll begin our exploration of the American environmental movement with a timely discussion of the role of national parks and wilderness.

This is timely because of the 100th anniversary of the US National Park Service (although some parks, notably Yellowstone and Yosemite, are older than that), and because of the addition of Maine Woods and Waters National Monument, formerly known as Elliotsville Plantation, ME.

First, read this article:

Then watch these movies: